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Authors, Books, & Writing Programs
Grammatical Gaffes: A Linguist Looks at Language Peeves

Are you someone who winces at the word irregardless? Do you find it hard to believe someone who tells you, “I was literally climbing the walls”? Do you wish everyone would use the Oxford comma in lists of three items? If so, this lively seminar on language is for you. (Hopefully, you’ll come.)

Date
Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
English Words: Etymologies and Curiosities

Over the past millennium and a half, the language we now call English has developed its deep, rich vocabulary by liberally adding words from other languages. This entertaining daylong program explores the origins of a range of English words and how words and phrases change meaning over time.

Date
Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
C. S. Lewis: Life and Legacy, Philosopher, Fantasist, and “Mere” Christian

Fifty-five years after his death, Clive Staple Lewis (1898-1963), Irish-born Oxford don, Cambridge professor, and best-selling author, still attracts and inspires readers and thinkers everywhere. In this absorbing daylong program, Lewis scholar Andrew Lazo offers insights into Lewis’ personal life, published works, and enduring appeal.

Date
Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Washington: City of Writers

Literary history—and that of the nation’s capital—is written in the words of Walt Whitman, Henry Adams, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and many other authors who called the city home. Writer and local historian Kim Roberts offers a lively cultural overview of D.C. through a literary lens.

Date
Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty.

Date
Monday, November 19, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Dante’s Divine Comedy: A Timeless Journey

Dante’s epic poem, a portrayal of the human condition both terrible and sublime, is explored by Frank Ambrosio, director of Georgetown University’s My Dante Project. He lays out a roadmap that allows you to follow the poet’s journey to personal discovery.

Date
Saturday, December 1, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Developing Character and Plot in Fiction Writing: An Organic Approach to Story Telling

Where do ideas for creating fictional characters come from? How are these ideas developed so that characters are both believable and complex? In this daylong program, writer Elizabeth Poliner leads a lively exploration of these questions through discussion and the use of in-class writing exercises.

Date
Saturday, December 1, 2018 - 10:00 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.
Sherlock Holmes in the Magnifying Glass

There’s no mystery why the fame of Sherlock Holmes now stretches into a third century. Writer Daniel Stashower turns a magnifying glass on the legendary sleuth of Baker Street and his creator. He is joined by actor Scott Sedar who reads from some of Conan Doyle’s classic works. A reception follows the program.

Date
Wednesday, December 5, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole.

Date
Monday, December 17, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Literature of the South: Defining a Genre

What do novelists like William Faulkner and Eudora Welty have in common that defines them by the honorific “Southern writer”? Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English Department at Georgetown University, leads a 4-session course about authors whose works uniquely define what it means to write about the South. This session discusses A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines.

Date
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.