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World History Programs
Americans and the Holocaust: History’s Enduring Questions

The Americans and the Holocaust exhibition at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum raises many questions about the response of the international community and the U.S. to the rise of Nazism. Two experts from the museum explore the exhibition’s issues, and participants are invited to experience the exhibition after-hours.  

Date
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Magical Prague: The Crown of Bohemia

Lose yourself in Prague, city of a hundred spires, as cultural historian Ursula Wolfman takes you on a virtual tour along its medieval cobblestone lanes and dark passageways, past its many churches and synagogues, into the heart of a city dominated by the magnificent Hradcany, the 1,100-year-old castle complex. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
China and Japan: A History of Empires

The influence of China and Japan on global history has been immense, and goes back further than many Americans may realize. To understand these nations in the context of the modern world, Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, provides a comprehensive perspective on thousands of years of their pasts in an informative lecture series. This session focuses on the Japanese Empire.

Date
Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Fin de Siècle Vienna: The Cradle of Modernity

As the 19th century drew to a close, Vienna was a city at the heart of a vanishing world power. It was also an incubator for some of the most important figures in the arts, letters, and philosophy: Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine explores the ways in which fin-de-siecle Vienna became the cradle of modernity in Central Europe. (World Art History Certificate elective, 1 credit)

Date
Saturday, December 8, 2018 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
The Cambridge Five: Soviet Intelligence Spies

Why would a group of young men from one of England’s elite universities betray their country for Russia? Using recently declassified British, American, and Soviet intelligence records, Historian and author Calder Walton examines the lives, motivations, damage, and legacy of the notorious Cold War operatives that came to be known as the Cambridge Five.

Date
Tuesday, December 11, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
A Tudor Christmas Celebration

Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger provides a colorful glimpse into how members of the Tudor dynasty and their courtiers marked the festive season with midwinter merrymaking fit for a king (or queen). Afterward, enjoy a Tudor-inspired holiday “feast.”

Date
Wednesday, December 12, 2018 - 6:45 p.m.
Churchill: The Man Behind the Myths

Historian Kevin Matthews discusses Winston Churchill’s tempestuous career as an army officer, war correspondent, member of Parliament, and minister in both Liberal and Conservative governments to reveal a man too often hidden by the post-World War II legends that surround him.

Date
Saturday, January 12, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Inside Shakespeare

Shakespeare created worlds out of words that have informed and shaped our language and culture for more than 400 years. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger examines how his histories, tragedies, and comedies so insightfully capture the full spectrum of the human condition.

Date
Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
The Medieval Illuminated Manuscript: Praising God with Exquisite Beauty

Art historian Laura McCloskey examines how the monk-artists who produced sumptuous illuminated books such as the The Book of Kells and the Lindisfarne Gospels created sacred texts that were also remarkable and innovative works of art.  (World Art History Certificate elective, 1/2 credit)

Date
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 6:45 p.m.
Jerusalem Through the Ages

What makes Jerusalem a unique and revered place? In an absorbing day of illustrated lectures, Jodi Magness, an archaeologist who is an expert on Jerusalem, traces how a poor, isolated mountain town became sacred to billions of followers of the three Abrahamic faiths worldwide.

Date
Saturday, February 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Napoleon: The Rise and Fall of a Man Who Changed History

Tracing Napoleon’s life from its Corsican roots, through military triumphs and defeats to the final exile, historian and Napoleon scholar Alexander Mikaberidze tells the story of the French leader’s remarkable life and of the sheer determination and careful calculation that brought him to the pinnacle of power in Europe.

Date
Saturday, February 2, 2019 - 9:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Chinese Art: From the Bronze Age to the People’s Republic

Chinese civilization has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. Art historian Robert DeCaroli examines how, across the centuries, China’s social, religious, and political life have influenced transformations in its material culture. (World Art History Certificate core course, 1 credit)

Date
Monday, February 4 to March 4, 2019 - 6:45 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. (no class Feb. 18)